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The Boeing 747 #Dreamlifter, also known as the #Boeing 747-400 Large Cargo Freighter (LCF), is a wide-body cargo aircraft modified extensively from the Boeing 747-400 airliner. With a volume of 65,000 cubic feet (1,840 m³)[1] the Dreamlifter can hold three times that of a 747-400F freighter.[2] It is used primarily for transporting Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft components to Boeing’s assembly plants from suppliers around the world.

#Boeing 787 parts were deemed too large for standard marine shipping containers as well as the Boeing 747-400F, Antonov An-124 and Antonov An-225.[4] Initially, three used passenger 747-400 aircraft were to be converted into an outsize configuration in order to ferry sub-assemblies from Japan and Italy to North Charleston, South Carolina, and then to Washington state for final assembly, but a fourth was subsequently added to the program.[5] The Large Cargo Freighter has a bulging fuselage similar in concept to the Super Guppy and #Airbus A300-600ST Beluga outsize cargo aircraft, which are also used for transporting wings and fuselage sections.
The LCF conversion was partially designed by Boeing’s Moscow bureau and Boeing Rocketdyne with the swing tail designed in partnership with Gamesa Aeronáutica of Spain.[6] The cargo portion of the aircraft is unpressurized. [7] Modifications were carried out in Taiwan by Evergreen Aviation Technologies Corporation,[2] a joint venture of Evergreen Group’s EVA Air and General Electric.[8] Boeing reacquired the four 747-400s; one former Air China aircraft,[9] two former China Airlines aircraft,[10][11] and one former Malaysia Airlines aircraft.[12]

The first 747 Large Cargo Freighter (LCF) was rolled out of the hangar at Taipei Taoyuan International Airport on August 17, 2006.[8] It successfully completed its first test flight on September 9, 2006 from this airport.[13]

The 787 Dreamliner parts are placed in the aircraft by the DBL-100 cargo loader, the world’s longest cargo loader.[14][15][16] In June 2006, the first DBL-100 cargo loader was completed.[17]

The 747 LCF’s unusual appearance has drawn comparisons to the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile and the Hughes H-4 Hercules (“Spruce Goose”).[5] Due to its ungainly form — exacerbated in that the first airplane remained unpainted for some time, due to the need for immediate testing — Boeing Commercial Airplanes president Scott Carson jokingly apologized to 747 designer Joe Sutter that he was “sorry for what we did to your plane.

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner is an American wide-body jet airliner manufactured by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. After dropping its Sonic Cruiser project, Boeing announced the conventional 7E7 on January 29, 2003, focused on efficiency. The program was launched on April 26, 2004, with an order for 50 from All Nippon Airways (ANA), targeting a 2008 introduction. On July 8, 2007, the prototype was rolled out without major systems, and experienced multiple delays until its maiden flight on December 15, 2009. Type certification was received in August 2011 and the first 787-8 was delivered in September 2011 before entering commercial service on October 26, 2011, with ANA.

At launch, Boeing targeted 20% less fuel burn than replaced aircraft like the Boeing 767, carrying 200 to 300 passengers on point-to-point routes up to 8,500 nmi (16,000 km), a shift from hub-and-spoke travel. The twinjet is powered by General Electric GEnx or Rolls-Royce Trent 1000 high-bypass turbofans, it is the first airliner with an airframe primarily made of composite materials, and makes extensive use of electrical systems. Externally, it is recognizable by its four-window cockpit, raked wingtips, and noise-reducing chevrons on its engine nacelles. Development and production rely increasingly on subcontractors around the world, with final assembly at the Boeing Everett Factory in Washington or Boeing South Carolina in North Charleston as of 2020.

The initial, 186 ft (57 m) long 787-8 typically seats 242 passengers over a range of 7,355 nmi (13,620 km), with a 502,500 lb (228 t) MTOW compared to 560,000 lb (254 t) for later variants. The stretched 787-9, 206 ft (63 m) long, can fly 7,635 nmi (14,140 km) with 290 passengers; it entered service on August 7, 2014, with ANA. The further stretched 787-10, 224 ft (68 m) long, seating 330 over 6,430 nmi (11,910 km), entered service with Singapore Airlines on April 3, 2018.

Early operations encountered several problems caused by its lithium-ion batteries, culminating in fires on board. In January 2013, the US FAA grounded all 787s until it approved the revised battery design in April 2013. As of March 2020, the 787 had orders for 1,510 aircraft from 72 identified customers. Due to ballooning production costs, Boeing has spent $32 billion on the program; estimates for the number of aircraft sales needed to break even vary between 1,300 and 2,000.

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