Home Β» Commercial Β» Airbus Β» A350 Β» Airbus A350neo: Is it real?

Airbus is currently scouting in the market for a potential engine supplier for a re-engined Airbus A350 aircraft. The A350neo would feature new engines that are set to compete against the Boeing 777X.

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Rolls-Royce: https://youtu.be/AVeEcPSy3JI
Airbus: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ES-teTIw7k

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#Airbus #AirbusA350neo

38 comments

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  • First

    If there's any A350NEO, that probably would be either UltraFan, successors of GENx, or anything PW can offer for that size, which should significantly bring down the fuel burn and maintain their current position.
    Maybe Airbus will decide offering a 779-sized variant is viable if the market is large enough.

  • In my opinion airbus releases way to many aircraft variants at times and they need better names for some of them like a220 something a320ulr a320neo a320xlr and isn’t their another one??πŸ˜‚

  • The Trent XWB is already maxed for thrust, and until RR finds a fix (they haven't) for the Trent 1000 (an issue that will hit the 3 year mark and beyond,) moving resources would be about as dumb a move as the mass layoffs they did shortly before their problems began. On the other hand, the GE9X is actually the most sophisticated technology leap (pardon the engine-pun) in turbofan engines that we've seen in decades. This is partly the cause of it's minor delay, because the list of new technologies in the GE9X is staggering. Also, GE and Boeing were wise to power the largest variant of the 777X (currently the -9) around the engines base capability, knowing that (having already broken the world thrust record) it can be up-rated to a 777-10/11, freighter, and quite likely an "LR" variant that will have the highest rated range of any aircraft, and do so without passenger/cargo capacity compromises like Airbus' "ULRs." Airbus is winning over customers during this grounded MAX phase, which I believe will be (come 5 years down the road,) a mistake for many airlines. Why? Because the A350-1000 does not have the sheer beast like capability for passengers and cargo that the current 77W does, and the Pratt GTF was never ready for prime-time, especially not for the thrust ratings needed in 321NEOs and ULR variants, and we might see that statement prove itself (sadly,) in time. IMO, Emirates made a mistake ordering the A350 and many airlines are rushing to order A320NEO family, when despite the deliberate MSM take-down of the MAX, in reality it's the lower weight, less costly maintenance option in the narrow-body market.

    Glad to see you making videos again, by the way.

    • On the contrary, the neo is more to address the lower end market rather than the limitations on the A350-1000. I would say that airbus is looking to end the exclusivity with RR on the A350 program. Airbus lost their sales pitch to ANA , korean Air and not so long ago Air NZ largely due to the sole engine supply.
      So to enable airbus to better capture the B777 replacement orders from the airlines, they are looking to enable a second engine choice to the list.
      The latest PIP to the GEnX-1B engine which Air NZ will be getting will enable higher MTOW for the B787, if equipped to the A350 will enable a superior performance for the aircraft. Currently some of the A350 are equipped with a derated 75klbs engine for shorter operations below 5000nm. So if airbus could get GE to produce a bleed air variant of its GEnX-1B76 from the B787-10 and hang it on the A350, this may further lower the per trip cost and CASM of the aircraft. Imagine an A350 with the operating costs of the B787. We'll have a real winner!

    • As regards the your opinion on Emirates, I will have to totally disagree. Moving forward, the A350-900 and the B777-9x will form the backbone of Emirates workhorse when their B77W and A380 retires. The A350-900 when configured with Emirates 3 class layout will bring its seating capacity below 300pax while the B777-9x will pack close to 400pax. The A350 will be serving thinner lighter routes therefore there is really no need for the beastly capability of the B777. Furthermore for Emirates, they will have the 150 B777X to do all the heavy lifting, so their A350 is most certainly for a different role and purpose.
      Not every airlines needs a beastly aircraft and not every aircraft needs to have beast like capability. Passengers concentric airlines with limited cargo operations are more suited for the A330neo & A350 rather than the excessive capability of the B777.
      Malaysia Airlines for one regretted its decision to upsize to the B777 as its capability was a waste since the airline had limited cargo operations and it lead to the airline operating in the reds as they did not have the cargo revenue to cover the beastly fuel appetite of the aircraft.

  • I would be interested to know what Airbus' plans are to compete with the passenger capacity the 777x offers now that the A380 program is ending. Adding a more efficient engine to the A350 can be part of the answer if they can develop a larger variant than the A350-1000.

  • What is going on with Airbus?!
    I would want to know what is the real reason for making all these variants of an aircraft, day after day… it's just useless and ridiculous

  • Rather than a neo, I would say that airbus is looking to end the exclusivity with RR on the A350 program. Airbus lost their sales pitch to ANA , korean Air and not so long ago Air NZ largely due to the sole engine supply.
    So to enable airbus to better capture the B777 replacement orders from the airlines, they are looking to enable a second engine choice to the list.
    The latest PIP to the GEnX-1B engine which Air NZ will be getting will enable higher MTOW for the B787, if equipped to the A350 will enable a superior performance for the aircraft. Currently some of the A350 are equipped with a derated 75klbs engine for shorter operations below 5000nm. So if airbus could get GE to produce a bleed air variant of its GEnX-1B76 from the B787-10 and hang it on the A350, this may further lower the per trip cost and CASM of the aircraft. Imagine an A350 with the operating costs of the B787. We'll have a real winner!

  • The first flight in 2013, 9 years later… are we in 2022 now? Oh I get it, I must have been resting on my morals

    LOL not taking the piss just couldn't resist

  • It makes sense! The A350 is much more popular than the A380, so there is an actual business case for a NEO version. And such a thing takes time thus they are already studying it. The A350 is still in development, I mean it's still been tweaked and improved. The optimized fuel system for example would most probably become a standard on all variants. And what better strategy than to do a NEO as soon as there is an engine worth using , it would make it compete even better against the 787 and 777X.
    This could mean in the long run that there could be also a NEO-2 around 2030 if technology hasn't changed that much.

  • I understand that having a GE or PW engine option for the A350 would help Airbus capture some of the market such as Korean, ANA, and ANZ among others, however, I am not sure if labelling it as NEO would be appropriate. It would simply be the same aircraft with different engines like the current A330CEOs out there. Perhaps the GE Engine would allow for higher Take Off Weights and/or more range or both, the GE engines are also larger and heavier (I think). This would require a lot of redesign work and testing on the current A350 — This would include stronger wings, landing gear, maybe even forcing airbus to lift the fuselage up off the ground further, etc… the list goes on. With the -900ULR variant available, I don't see range being a key talking point where re-engining is considered. So what would be other reasons for Airbus to consider a different engine option?

  • Rolls Royce engines was and still is a disaster for B787 Dreamliner. GE appears to be a better option for the older generation ones used on B777 200/300

  • Does the 747-8 use bleed air? If so, GE can modify the GENX-2B used on the 747-8 for the A350 instead of a GENX-1, which would need more modifications than the -2to be A350 appropriate

  • RR will pretty much have all it’s eggs in the Ultrafan basket. That project is progressing and is rumored to be possibly ready for a re-engined A350 by 2026. The GE move could be a fatal blow to that plan.

  • One of the best ways they could improve the A350 efficiency is lighter carbon fiber parts. EADS has been developing looms to weave carbon fiber parts from single threads of fiber rather than tape. This allows them to build parts that are strong in the direction of the loads and so they can make parts that are lighter but every bit as strong enough. Once the loom development is ready, this could really lighten the A350 substituting the existing carbon fiber parts.

  • I think the main issue about A380 was the price. Decreasing price by 40% would generate lots of demand. My 5 cents πŸ™‚

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