Home » Aircrafts » Cessna » Skyhawk » Stop Being A Baby! Student Solo Flight in Cessna 172 – Road to Private Episode 16

Total logged time before this flight: 25.3 Hours

Hey Friends! I love making these flight videos, and I’m so glad you’re enjoying them as well. I could really use your help. Would you mind taking a moment and sharing this channel with your friends – in flight forums, Facebook groups you belong to, etc.?

Lately, I’ve hit a mental road block. There have been many cases where I’ve went to the field, preflighted the airplane, fueled up, then put the plane right back away because I just couldn’t bring myself to fly solo. There is this strange fear that has crept in.

So in this episode, I’ve planned a solo cross country from 4G7 to KAFJ via KCKB. I fly the first leg (including one of the very worst approaches I’ve ever flown – completely ignoring the pitch/power relationship), then the mental stuff kicks in.

Please click the thumbs up below, subscribe to my channel, share with your friends online, and leave your comments below – I’d love to hear from you!

0:50 – Setting Radios
1:44 – KCKB ATIS
2:22 – Today’s Flight Plan
3:17 – Taxi to 4G7 Runway 23
5:45 – Pre-Takeoff Checklist
8:55 – Runway 23 Departure
12:01 – Leaving Fairmont Area CTAF Call
12:35 – Calling KCKB Tower
15:04 – High and Fast (and bad) Approach KCKB Runway 21
17:15 – Short Final
20:10 – Getting in my own head…
22:05 – Calling Ground & Taxiing
25:29 – Departing Runway 21
29:40 – Fairmont CTAF Call
31:37 – Abeam Touchdown Point
32:04 – Turning Base Runway 23
32:43 – Turning Final (LOW!)
33:34 – Short Final


Airplane: 1966 Cessna 172G
Airport: 4G7 (Fairmont, WV)

DISCLAIMER:
I am a student pilot, documenting my journey to private pilot. These videos are intended for entertainment, and should not be considered flight instruction. Editing removes important context. Please contact a local CFI to learn more about flight instruction.

26 comments

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    • Thanks, man. Appreciate the feedback. It's just aggravating when you miss the basics. I was ultimately reasonably happy with the landings.

  • Cstrange how as students we are taught to fly in the pattern but when it comes to towered airports all that goes out the window.

  • You are doing great! It can be challenging getting past the head games. I'm a new PPL at age 59, with one year under my belt. There is always a new challenge for us newbies. Experience brings confidence. Looks like you have some defined personal minimums which is really smart and safe. It's hard to not complete a mission as planned with external pressures (IMSAFE) but you did 😉😊

  • WAY TO MAN UP! You defeated your demon puss cake! That aircraft is always ready to fly, you're the only asset that would make it change or make it dangerous. So remember, the plane can fly without you. All you have to do is enjoy the ride. With 6722 hrs in the F-15C I've been scared, just never vocalized it or put it on the web. Bravo Zulu my man.

  • The more you get out and fly, the more you will go out and fly…… the more ya do it the more confidence you will have and keep 👍

  • Went through the same struggles. Pre flight, then talk myself out of flying. Last month, almost talked myself out of a beautiful San Francisco Bay tour with my daughter and two of her friends. It was night and rainy. Was afraid visibility would be bad. Finally decided to stay in the pattern to at least get them up in the air. From pattern altitude, I could see the lights of the city and made the decision to complete the mission. The Golden Gate Bridge, Bay Bridge, and downtown lights were spectacular. Each step of the way I was prepared to shut it down. Each trip is a series of decisions, I pray we all make good ones. I am 58 and have had mutt ppl less than a year. You will make it.

  • Lol, Listen to Russ, don’t put your inner voice in the video.
    I’m enjoying your videos, you have some good editing skills. Keep up the great work!
    52L is a fine looking aircraft also.

  • Do you have a crosswind phobia? Fly that airplane bruh. That's the mighty Skyhawk you're flying, not the Chickenhawk!

  • Well you really shouldn't be a pilot what happens when your flying and the xwind exceeds the limits and you have a nominal alternate with a Xwind……

  • I asked my instructors how many hours it took them to get completely relaxed when flying, and both responded around 200.. So we're still within 🙂 Follow the procedures and nothing will happen! Cavok from student pilot @YMMB aerodrome (currently at 8 hours) !

  • Have your instructor take you up on a windy day and do a bunch of take offs and landings. You’d be amazed how much cross wind a Cessna can handle. I took my flight training in a 152 up in the Pacific Northwest and landed in really strong winds. Once you do it and actually realize that you AND the aircraft can handle it you be a hell of a lot more confident. Being solo in an aircraft isn’t the place to continually doubt yourself!

  • Love your videos. Your camera shots and editing are fantastic, I'd love to know what editing software you use. Cool airplane as well. Know what you mean about the mental stuff, it happens, but you push thru it. Nice work! By the way, before I went solo xcountry, I spent a lot of solo time in the pattern practicing xwind landings, with more wind each time I went out, and it really helped me. Before you know it, you'll be landing on 1 wheel like a pro!

  • I'd review the perils of dragging every approach to landing and counting on power to save the bacon. Being low, then dumping flaps will lead to some exciting arrivals in the future. I enjoy your videos and commentary – I'm sure you're all certified by now. All the best.

  • I remember when my instructor first took me out in winds about 18knots gusting to 28+ during my PPL training in a 172 when I was learning to land. It was a challenge, but it gave me immense confidence going forward. I don't think I've had a day without winds at least 10 knots, but once they start gusting over 30 knots I stay on the ground. I envy the people who train at airports with light winds. Much easier to learn the basics.

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